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Any Triathletes out there, have question

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cygo
 cygo
(@cygo)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 90
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Hi,

Anyone into triathlons, marathons or long bike rides (multiple hour rides)?

If so what do you do for nutrition and hydration during training and on race day?

I have begun to train for a Sprint Triathlon which is a mini triathlon, total race time should be under 2 hours.

I am trying to find the best combination of nutrition and hydration that does not create the need to stop and empty my bag or pee during the actual race.  

Currently when I am at the gym (1-2 hours) I usually do not need to empty my bag but I also probably don't eat enough before morning workouts and that is not good for triathlons.

Any triathletes out there? What do you do?

Thank you.

cygo

cygo
Ileostomy


   
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VeganOstomy
(@veganostomy)
Admin
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 4176
 

Posted by: @cygo

Anyone into... long bike rides (multiple hour rides)?

Me! While not competitive, my weekend rides are generally a minimum 60km, but usually 80-100km.

Posted by: @cygo

If so what do you do for nutrition and hydration during training and on race day?

While in no way scientific or anything, this is what I do.

** Please keep in mind that I load my bike in a way that allows me to have everything I need during my ride. Even though I make bathroom stops, I don't have to stop anywhere else for extra water or food. This causes my bike to be much heavier than usual, but I find the weight helps with my fitness anyway. Obviously, I don't expect the same from a bike used for a triathlon. **

The night before, I eat a usual dinner and will often snack until bedtime. This causes me to have output several times in the morning (my usual routine).  If I try to cheat by either not eating past a certain time or if I take a laxative to lower the need that I'll have to empty, this DOES affect my performance, so I don't do that anymore.

The morning of, I will often have overnight oats with an all-in-one protein powder. This keeps my output on the thick side, and helps to slow down movements. I've never had issues with this breakfast.

I will also prepare a special meal for my ride, which usually consists of: oats, raisins, nuts, sometimes a protein powder, and a cereal of my choice for flavouring. I will put this all in an insulated bottle and add water. When I'm ready to eat it (typically just before the midpoint of my ride), it'll be like a slurry that I can drink/chew/swallow during my stop.  I estimate that this meal is approx. 800 calories.

I will also try to drink a full bottle of water with an electrolyte mix added.

During my ride, I will eat some kind of energy bar or granola bar. Since Cliff bars have become prohibitively expensive, I've opted for the (very crummy!) Nature Valley granola bars, which are around $3 / box with 5 packs (10 bars) in each box. A pack gives around 200 calories, and I'll typically have either one or two packs an hour, depending on how long I ride.

I do keep track of my calories used on my bike computer, which is more accurate when I use a heart rate monitor, and I try to match my calories consumed with what I've burned (less around 1000 calories for any glycogen stores that are used up).

I will drink at my snack stops, but also at some actual stops (red light intersections). To be honest, I've never found myself running out of water during a ride, and I'm often coming home with a lot of water left. Heat and exertion will influence hydration, so I would imagine that my needs will increase as the weather heats up.

Most of the time, I'm only drinking plain water, but I will bring an electrolyte sachet just in case. I bring plain water because it can be used for other things, like cleaning a wound, washing my hands or dirty brake pads, etc. If I add anything to it before, it limits me only to drinking it.

After my ride, I will usually eat carbs when I get home (bananas, noodles, cereal, etc.) and will drink if I'm thirsty. I'm usually too busy when I get home to worry about nutrition until dinner time.

Posted by: @cygo

I am trying to find the best combination of nutrition and hydration that does not create the need to stop and empty my bag or pee during the actual race.  

As I mentioned, I'm not into competitive cycling, but hopefully someone who is can offer some strategies.

I personally feel that emptying my bag/peeing often is a necessary side effect of being fuelled up. As I mentioned, any attempts to cheat the "what goes in must come out" reality will regularly cause drastic performance losses.

Good luck, and it's great that you're training for a triathlon!

Just your friendly neighborhood ostomate.
~ Crohn's Disease ¦ Ileostomy ~


   
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(@dogtalkerer)
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 313
 

since i have a colostomy, things are different.   I have been in 10mile kayak races, 28mile cross country ski races and 30mile mountain bike races.     i use those little jell packs at 25%, 50% &  75% of race course.  watered down gatoraid, and a bottle of full strength gatoraid.    breakfast has always been pancakes, lots of butter, maple syrup and bacon.   25yrs of racing breakfasts never failed.   most of those races almost 3hrs.   

i have normally done the carbo loading the  night before, pasta,olive oil & garlic.    that also slows down my system and only drain a small amount in the bag in morning and none the rest of the day til evening.

your best information will come from experience.   practice doing different methods well before race day.


   
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VeganOstomy
(@veganostomy)
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Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 4176
 

Hey @cygo, something that I hadn't thought of that could be an option for you are carbohydrate powders or something similar. I haven't used any, but they deliver a lot of calories without the bulk of food, you just mix it into water. I can see this helping to really cut down on output, since there is no bulk or fiber to pass through your body.

Gel packs, as dogtalkerer mentioned, would be another option ? 

If I get a chance to try some while cycling, I'll let you know how it goes!

Just your friendly neighborhood ostomate.
~ Crohn's Disease ¦ Ileostomy ~


   
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