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Healing the Skin around the Stoma - OSTOMY TIPS (w/ Video)

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(@Sherry)
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 1
 

I am a new osteomate. My home health-care ostomy RN is terrible. I have a double-barrel stoma. She has come one time. She rushed through it and my bag started leaking shortly after she left. The other care providers are not at all knowledgeable. I am very worried about the next wafer change. You have been a life-saver for me. I cannot thank you enough, but I am giving a small donation. Thank you so much, Eric, from the bottom of my heart.


   
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VeganOstomy
(@veganostomy)
Admin
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 4229
Topic starter  

Hi Sherry,

I'm so sorry that you've had that experience. Do you get a different nurse every visit, or is the same one?

Regular nurses generally don't have the same knowledge to care for a stoma, especially a more complex one like a double-stoma.

Do you have access to, or can you request, a WOCN (wound, ostomy, and continence nurse)? They should be able to give you far better care.

Just your friendly neighborhood ostomate.
~ Crohn's Disease ¦ Ileostomy ~


   
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(@Ashby Pettigrew)
Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 1
 

Hi Eric,
I cannot thank you enough for the thoughtful and thorough stoma information that you share! I’ve had an ileostomy since February 5th of this year. I use the crusting technique, a barrier ring and a belt and continue to have skin issues around my stoma. Why do you think the lack of crust works? Is it because it allows the skin to breath? (Maybe you’ve addressed this and I simply missed it) Of course if the skin issues continue I will reach out to my fantastic stoma nurse. In the meantime I would like to try your recommendations!

Thank you again for all you do for our community!

Sincerely,
Ashby


   
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VeganOstomy
(@veganostomy)
Admin
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 4229
Topic starter  

Hi Ashby,

Skin issues can be difficult to identify, since there can be a wide range of causes.

Does your skin look like mine in the photos? Is it only a ring around the stoma, or is the damage/irritation under a larger area of the wafer?

Sometimes the crusting technique isn't appropriate, and sometimes it is. The example in the article uses only the barrier ring without crusting, since the problem was more likely caused by skin erosion from output. The barrier ring basically stops further erosion, and helped to heal the skin.

But if the skin was being irritated by something else, then adding stoma powder + a barrier wipe will allow the skin to heal while also providing a good substrate for the appliance or barrier ring to stick.

It's common to have more skin issues shortly after surgery. The stoma is often changing size (shrinking), so you'll need to stay on top of sizing the hole in your wafer with every change. But also the skin hasn't really adapted to the appliance, and the moisture that can be trapped under it.

If your skin looks very weepy (wet), and rash-like, it may be best to have a stoma nurse take a look. Anything from a sensitivity, allergy, or fungal infection would need to be handled differently.

Best to you!

Just your friendly neighborhood ostomate.
~ Crohn's Disease ¦ Ileostomy ~


   
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