Community Forums

Notifications
Clear all

Bikes and seats

19 Posts
8 Users
11 Likes
846 Views
 Rick
(@rick)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 119
Topic starter  

Thanks for the responses!  Once healed can you still ride a bike without worries of damage? 


   
Quote
(@kedikat)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 90
 

Haven't ridden a bicycle for years. No problem riding my motorcycle of course. Flat comfy seat.

At two and a half months I think I might have some discomfort with a bicycle. Still a bit sensitive right along the scar line. Just surface sensitivity. But it also took quite some time for the entire surface of my stomach skin to settle down. Was hyper sensitive, at and far from the actual incision. I would say my butt incision area is still as sensitive as some spots of the stomach incision line. Not bad. But bike ride might still be an issue.

Why?


   
ReplyQuote
(@christine)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 2
 

Hello, first post here.  I had an abdominoperineal resection 14 weeks ago (mid-March); my rectum removed and sewn up.  It's really only the last 3 weeks that I have been able to sit without being super careful about lowering myself down.  I had questions about bicycle riding and my ostomy nurse said for sure not this summer although the surgeon said maybe in the fall.  The ostomy nurse pointed out that nothing heals as fast on the inside as the outside, and that with the movement of the legs it could cause problems. I'm leaving my bike in the shed till next year; for me better safe than sorry is the best choice.


   
VeganOstomy and kedikat reacted
ReplyQuote
VeganOstomy
(@veganostomy)
Admin
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 4176
 
Posted by: @kedikat

No problem riding my motorcycle of course. Flat comfy seat.

I haven't been able to ride a bike because of my butt wound (not only pain, but the closure tears and bleeds if I try).

I was considering trying a "motorcycle style" seat to see if it makes a difference.  Glad it works for you.  What do you ride? 

Just your friendly neighborhood ostomate.
~ Crohn's Disease ¦ Ileostomy ~


   
Christine reacted
ReplyQuote
bagbob
(@bagbob)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 18
 

I'm glad the bicycle question came up. I've been enjoying riding with my 14yo and 13yo daughters this spring and summer. our house is just four blocks from a 50 mile bike trail. I can put off my rectal surgery till next fall and still get some bike rides in this year. Although I've had to ditch my light, fast road bike for a more comfortable slower hybrid bike being able to ride with my daughters this year has been really great after being sick and going through surgery last year.  ~BOB

ulcerative colitis since 2011
ileostomy 3-3-2021


   
VeganOstomy reacted
ReplyQuote
(@squeakyandliza)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 992
 

@veganostomy and @bagbob

Have you guys thought about checking into recumbent bikes?  With the reclined setup, it would take some of the pressure off your bum, plus I would think they could easily be fitted with more of a flat seat, if they don’t already come with it. 

-Liza
Ileostomy 6/18/2018
“May your day be bright and your bag be light.”


   
ReplyQuote
(@kedikat)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 90
 

@veganostomy

I have a Suzuki DL650. VStrom. It's a more dual purpose bike. Been coast to coast here in Canada on it. Camping along the way. But haven't done a long trip in years.

For actual bicycles. There are a wide variety of seat options. Never tried any when I was cycling, just the regular type.

Still quite fresh healing on my wound. But I do notice one or two, I guess you could call them webs? Like between your fingers, but across the crack. I am doing some stretching to make sure they are not going to tear at some point.

Also. Now I am getting the urge to buy a bicycle again. Damn.

Why?


   
ReplyQuote
(@kedikat)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 90
 

Flat seat. Canadian Tire in Canada.

https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/supercycle-no-pressure-bike-saddle-0733089p.html#srp

Why?


   
VeganOstomy reacted
ReplyQuote
VeganOstomy
(@veganostomy)
Admin
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 4176
 
Posted by: @squeakyandliza

Have you guys thought about checking into recumbent bikes?

I've seen several in the area, but they're too big for my place (no garage). My ideal bike would be an electric bike for roads and trails (not offroad). But there's no way I'd invest in one until I'm sure it would work.

I ended up buying and selling a larger ebike shortly after my surgery, and that was a decision I still think about. 

Posted by: @kedikat

Suzuki DL650

Beautiful ride ?

Posted by: @kedikat

Flat seat. Canadian Tire in Canada.

> https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/supercycle-no-pressure-bike-saddle-0733089p.html#srp

I had a seat like that on a beautiful beach cruisec that I ended up selling after I got sick (before my surgery). My butt was so raw back then, and I was so sick that I couldn't ride. I don't know how it might work now.

It's not necessary the sitting that hurts (although, it absolutely does on a regular bike seat), it's the peddling while seated that causes problems. Perhaps a true ebike (not pedal assist) might be worth considering, but that would kill any chance of exercising while riding ?

Just your friendly neighborhood ostomate.
~ Crohn's Disease ¦ Ileostomy ~


   
ReplyQuote
(@christine)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 2
 

That Canadian Tire seat is a 'nose-less' saddle; designed for people whose private bits get numb when they ride.  There are degrees of nose and lack thereof (semi-nose-less) available.  Some cycling stores carry them; my guess is they would work better than the Supercycle model at Canuck Tire.  Certainly they would be more expensive.  I will be checking them out next year.


   
ReplyQuote
(@dogtalkerer)
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 313
 

you're not going to know until you try riding.

since my colostomy I've done some 1,000mile seasons on a very skinny seat. my longest ride was 69miles on old logging roads and 2 tracks.

need to allow time for your body/muscles to adjust. slowly build up your miles if you have discomfort.  a lot of times discomfort will diminish with time in the saddle.

 

 


   
VeganOstomy reacted
ReplyQuote
(@dogtalkerer)
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 313
 

Jeff, I think you're jumping the gun a bit if you've just had surgery in March.   my 1st & 2nd ride this season was rather uncomfortable, 3rd ride was 4x better than 1st while being twice as long  


   
ReplyQuote
VeganOstomy
(@veganostomy)
Admin
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 4176
 

@dogtalkerer Is it a "traditional" seat or do you have a gel pad or anything else to make it more comfortable? 

Just your friendly neighborhood ostomate.
~ Crohn's Disease ¦ Ileostomy ~


   
ReplyQuote
VeganOstomy
(@veganostomy)
Admin
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 4176
 
Posted by: @dogtalkerer

my 1st & 2nd ride this season was rather uncomfortable, 3rd ride was 4x better than 1st while being twice as long  

Reviving an old thread, but I've got my first bike ordered since my surgery and I'm a little nervous about how my bottom will handle it. 

@dogtalkerer, are you still riding, and if so, what kind of saddle are you using on your bike?

I may stick with the stock saddle for the first few weeks while it breaks in, but I've been eyeing some really nice saddles from Brooks out of England. 

Just your friendly neighborhood ostomate.
~ Crohn's Disease ¦ Ileostomy ~


   
ReplyQuote
(@dogtalkerer)
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 313
 

VO, my riding shorts do have traditional padding. My bike seat is as narrow as i can find.

If you're not in shape, give your body time to adjust.  Ive never felt competitive til i've got my first100miles in.    

 


   
VeganOstomy reacted
ReplyQuote
(@dogtalkerer)
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 313
 

I do sit back farther on the saddle, so i'm not putting any pressure on the incision area.  

I usually don't feel like i'm getting in shape before my 100mile mark, goes for biking,kayaking,skiing.

 

1658339514-0720221103-1.jpg

   
ReplyQuote
VeganOstomy
(@veganostomy)
Admin
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 4176
 

@dogtalkerer Thanks. I've ridden over 60km so far (with the saddle that came with the bike) and after the first two rides, it became a lot more comfortable. 

I do plan to do some long-distance rides (100km) once my endurance improves, so I'll have time to explore other saddle options if I find that longer rides hurt more. 

But as it is, I'm both happy and surprised that it's as comfortable as it's been. 

Just your friendly neighborhood ostomate.
~ Crohn's Disease ¦ Ileostomy ~


   
ReplyQuote
cygo
 cygo
(@cygo)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 90
 

My mountain bike came with a pretty comfortable gel seat.  I have been out for a couple of test rides since my June surgery and it seems to be no more uncomfortable than before my surgery.  My rides are usually under an hour.

The angle you sit on your bike will impact how your seat feels and some seats are designed to place your back at certain angles.  Mine is about 60 degrees and I find that works well, I tend to sit on my sit bones, this does not seem to put any pressure on my incision scar.

Happy Trails. 

cygo
Ileostomy


   
VeganOstomy reacted
ReplyQuote
VeganOstomy
(@veganostomy)
Admin
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 4176
 

@cygo I now have two bikes. LOL

One is my 20" tire folding bike, touring beast! It's got a high-end saddle and suspension seat post.

The other is a 30+ year vintage MTB with 26" tires that I restored. That has an "amazon special" saddle and regular seat post. Surprisingly enough, it's very comfortable to ride, perhaps due to the MTB tires and/or lower pressure I keep them at, but I haven't been out for more than an hour with that bike, so it's hard to know.

I can ride my foldie for hours on end with no issues, but I do wear cycling shorts with anti chafe rub on it to be safe.

Finding the right angle, distance, and reach is key. If one of those variables is off, then nothing feels good for very long.

Just your friendly neighborhood ostomate.
~ Crohn's Disease ¦ Ileostomy ~


   
ReplyQuote