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Sasquatch
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29/03/2019 8:01 am  

As Eric had in the previous post, I too last Thursday had a mishap with my stoma.  I do a fairly physical job, I'm a technician for a group of engineers in a factory.  It requires using all sorts of power and hand tools, as I build workstations, carts and such for our production areas.  This particular afternoon, I was cutting trim for a table top on the table saw in the shop.  Anyone familiar with table saws knows, they sometimes have a tendency to kick material back at you when using it.  Well, that was exactly what happened, it was a 1/4" thick piece of rigid plastic.  It hit me in the belly, to the left of my stoma, and must have pivoted and got the stoma too.  It didn't seem to do any damage to it, but the seam where it was stitched to my skin opened up.  It didn't even realize it had done anything until it felt wet.  Blood had soaked through the wafer, at was making it peel off.  I initially tried to dab the blood off to see where it was coming from, but obviously couldn't see anything because it was coming from under the wafer.  I decided it was probably a good idea to get someone to look at it, so I called for one of our first aid responders to take a look.  Of course in a factory setting, this caused a flurry of activity, accident reports and such.  We proceeded to pull back the edge of the wafer and blood pretty much came gushing out.  The lady who came to look at it is a part time EMT, and immediately decided it was more than she could deal with there, so they sent me to the ER down the street.  Once the initial bleeding stopped, it wasn't so bad.  It is now healing on it's own, but it was very scary moment.

UC since 2002, subtotal colectomy Dec. 2016, proctolectomy Nov. 2018.


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john68
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29/03/2019 11:23 am  

Hi Sasquatch, You have been a very lucky lad, any of us who work with tools or machines run an extra risk. Wishing you well that any injury heals quickly. I hope this weekend is a quiet one for all our community 🙏

ileostomy 31st August 1994 for Crohns


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Chris
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29/03/2019 11:46 am  

I just passed out and haven't come to yet.

Hope it heals well and quick. Do you have a guard? I have one but always forget to use it and find myself in precarious situations. Good reminder..


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VeganOstomy
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29/03/2019 1:30 pm  

My god that sounds intense! I'm glad you're ok! 

I'm also curious if you had a stoma guard on (or will consider one). 

Just your friendly neighborhood ostomate.

~ Crohn's Disease ¦ Ileostomy ~


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john68
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29/03/2019 2:07 pm  

Am sure any one working in construction or with machinery will be familiar with the company “Dickies “ I have always worn the body warmer which is made from hard wearing material and does offer quite good protection. Check out the company as they quite wearable for all not just on site 

ileostomy 31st August 1994 for Crohns


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LK
 LK
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29/03/2019 6:20 pm  

Oh Sasquatch...you poor guy! Scary moment there. So glad you had it checked it out.  I love doing woodwork of all kinds and have recently found a neighbor that will cut my wood now for me . I am  So glad you were relatively alright from that. Did they have to stitch your stoma back in place or what did they do about it?  The men in our lives have it so much harder I think.  In general most people expect men to lift heavy things, cut wood, deal with the car, the lawn...you can name even more things that men are "expected" to do.   How do you gentlemen out there explain when there is something your asked to do and you realize it would not be a good idea because of your stoma?  Seat belts in the car scare me a bit  when it comes to my stoma. Before stoma time, my daughter was a driving a car we were in, and we were in an accident.  Keeping in mind that I am in the same crowd...some much older grey head decided to run a stop sign on a very busy road.  We were up front and T-boned her.  I went flying forward and up towards the top of the windshield area hitting it with my face. I had some amazing bruising from the seat belt and in the area of where my stoma is now. I have made a seat belt guard using a section a pool noodle, cut it in half length wise. It works well and I am glad I have it.  Thank you for sharing your experience. I think we have to be more careful about things then the average person.

Chris...take a few deep breaths,  put your head between your knees and keep breathing, in thru your  nose, out thru your mouth, nice and controlled. You should feel better soon.  

Linda


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LLNorth
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30/03/2019 12:07 am  

Oh, goodness - I hope that all is healing well, Sasquatch.

I love the smell of coffee in the morning. It smells like .... victory.


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Dona
 Dona
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30/03/2019 2:01 pm  

OUCCCCH! Susquatch,

Thats horrifying. Happy to hear you  didn't get hurt any worse.

You maybe need some steel tipped underwear!  ( Just joking).

We used to have a radial arm saw and called it the radical harm saw......scary.

Onset of severe Ulcerative Colitus Oct.2012. Subtotal colectomy with illiostomy July 2015; Peristomal hernia repair ( Sugarbaker, mesh, laparoscopic) May 2017.


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sjlovestosing
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01/04/2019 8:10 am  

Hi Sasquatch,

I've not checked in in a couple of days and just found out about your accident. What a terrible thing to happen, but a good reminder to us all the need for protection - especially when doing physical labor. I'm glad to hear that you are doing alright! Take care and God bless.

Stella


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Sasquatch
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01/04/2019 11:39 am  
Posted by: VeganOstomy

My god that sounds intense! I'm glad you're ok! 

I'm also curious if you had a stoma guard on (or will consider one). 

No, I was wearing an OstomySecrets wrap, and a T-shirt, not much protection.  I don't really like the idea of a stoma guard, but I have ordered a protective apron.  With all of the saws and powered equipment I use, it's probably a good idea.

UC since 2002, subtotal colectomy Dec. 2016, proctolectomy Nov. 2018.


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LK
 LK
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01/04/2019 1:20 pm  

Sasquatch...would you please reconsider wearing a stoma guard. Eric has reviews of some. Maybe you can find one there that would be appropriate for the type of work you do. I do not mean to pry and feel free not to answer, but i there a reason you would prefer not wear one? Would it maybe draw questions about what is under your shirt that you would prefer not to answer? In that light, I wonder...Eric, did you find one of the stoma guards to be more discreet then others? I know for myself how I feel when what is going on under my cloths becomes more obvious and I really do not like that.  But, I do not work out in public, so my situation is different. However, I can understand not wanting to announce my stoma publicly.  What is this work apron  like that you have ordered?  All the best Sasquatch, I hope you have a great week at work. 

Linda

Linda


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john68
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01/04/2019 1:49 pm  

Stoma guards are a useful peice of equipment that is no doubt. But and by the way it’s just one mans opinion,  wearing some of these items for 8 plus hours in hot dusty and dirty conditions they can become very uncomfortable and restrict movement. Also in some working situations it involves squeezing into tight spaces. The protective apron would be a great protection.i know protective clothing for me has always protected well. 

ileostomy 31st August 1994 for Crohns


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LK
 LK
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01/04/2019 11:29 pm  

John...Hello. Sasquatch... Would a protective apron be made of leather or something like that? I only know what tools belts are, not the same thing I am sure. I know the types of jobs my hubby had over the years and the one time he said he wished he was wearing something to protect himself with was during a forestry job. Lets just say that a chainsaw had a picnic on my mans lower legs. At that time, there was not one thing available for the men to wear to protect their legs. It is, what it is, right.  Luckily he was younger and recovered really well from that incident. I agree that protection or no protection is everyones right.  Comfort is for sure front and center. I personally could not tolerate something that made me hotter then I want to be. Those were really great points to bring out in the open.  Thanks John!

Linda


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john68
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02/04/2019 3:48 am  

Any of these protective garments are made from a range of materials. They vary in thickness and weight depending on the type of job. From cutting, welding and working with hazardous liquids. A while back a job I done was security fencing and barbed wire was being used. We wore woven jackets and used stapled gloves. Their are some cases where a guard would not offer protection. But still want to add the stoma guard still is a great option which suits and works, I don’t want to take away from that. If I worked in an office I would look a right clown dressed looking like I should be in Game of Thrones 😂

ileostomy 31st August 1994 for Crohns


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Sasquatch
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02/04/2019 11:02 am  

As John said, wearing a restrictive guard on the job wouldn't be the most comfortable thing.  I work a 10 hour shift, my work can vary greatly from day to day.  I might only use hand tools one day, the next I may do a lot of material cutting, the following I could be moving equipment.  A removable apron used when needed I think is my best option.  If I were repeatedly doing a job and constantly banging my stoma into something, or had the threat of damage being done as a constant worry, a guard might be the better option.  The apron I've ordered is a heavy wear resistant leather, it should offer all the protection I need, when I need it.  

UC since 2002, subtotal colectomy Dec. 2016, proctolectomy Nov. 2018.


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sjlovestosing
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02/04/2019 3:23 pm  

My  husband uses a heavy duty leather apron when he operates his table saw and planer. He knows all about kickbacks from the saw, since he uses one a great deal in his work as a carpenter/re-modeler/cabinet maker. 

Stella :-) 


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LK
 LK
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02/04/2019 5:49 pm  

Back in the day, Grade 8, I was the only girl to take the woodworking course. We started with a spice rack, then a wooden box, then moved on to a night stand.  I loved the class and I did get some of the best marks over some of the guys.  I kept my box and looked after it well. Then, married with kids,  our home was broken into, my box and the things I treasured were stolen. It was likely my most favorite thing in the world. I loved working with the power tools and would to this day if I could afford them. When you make something with your hands it is a very satisfying thing to do. I was heart broken when my box went missing. I gave to spice rack to my Mom, in hopes she would learn to use spices and herbs ( she never did). I still have the night stand, my grandson uses it now, it is sturdy as ever, but the box...  :(  .  Anyways, on talking about heavy duty work aprons, it brought back the memory of my teacher walking around the class in his deep brown apron quietly encouraging the boys!  You are young Sasquatch, this is not likely your last injury in the type of work you do (tho I hope it is).  Not to repeat myself, but, I believe that men have it the hardest in life when it comes to work, and expectations.  I have always admired the muscle strength my husband (had) and my son has. Let us know how this apron pans out for you.  I hope it does the trick for all the different hats you wear.  Thank you all for the input to John and Stella.

Linda

Linda


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john68
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02/04/2019 7:05 pm  

If this topic does one thing out of a nasty situation is that ostomates do normal jobs and move in the real world. Yep we have limits but always there is a way around those limits. Building and making things has always been my passion. Loved woodwork at school, I once nailed our woodwork teachers jacket to the door, the rest of the class thought it was hilarious, it seemed to pass him by!!😀 I got detention for a week 😩

ileostomy 31st August 1994 for Crohns


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sjlovestosing
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03/04/2019 9:01 am  

Egad, John!

Who'd a "thunk"! :-D  (I guess we all have a wee bit o' the leprechaun in us!)

Stella


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VeganOstomy
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03/04/2019 12:28 pm  

That protective apron sounds like a great idea - for anyone working in the same job. I suspect it will offer the same or better protection compared to a stoma guard, and it'll likely be more comfortable for you too. Glad something good has come from this!

Just your friendly neighborhood ostomate.

~ Crohn's Disease ¦ Ileostomy ~


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