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low carb snack ideas?  

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bonbon
(@bonbon)
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January 24, 2019 2:27 pm  

as i am relitivly new to this i am just venturing out into new foods. could have done so a bit ago but have been overly cautious. :/ im ready to try new things but all the dieticians advice is starch and more starch to slow output. i lost 25 lbs after surg. have gained back 10 and id like to stop there! im looking for ideas for snacky foods that arent chips and crackers. id love any ideas you may have. :) thank you. 

bonnie


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VeganOstomy
(@veganostomy)
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January 24, 2019 3:30 pm  

Hi Bonnie, 

Just to clarify, are you looking for low carb to help with weight loss/maintenance? If so, it may be calories that would want to keep an eye on (and not carbs specifically).

If you are still looking for low cab snacks you'll either be looking at something like fruit and vegetables (naturally low in overall calories and/or carbs) or something higher in fat or protein.

Are you looking for something to satisfy a craving, to keep your hunger in check until the next meal, or for enjoyment? I think we can come up with a few ideas once we understand your needs 😉

Just your friendly neighborhood ostomate.

~ Crohn's Disease ¦ Ileostomy ~


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bonbon
(@bonbon)
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January 24, 2019 5:15 pm  

not trying to lose any more weight. just finding that the dieticians advice for high protein foods and potato, rice, pasta etc. that im seeing weight creep up and yet i dont feel like its very nutritious. empty foods to thicken output. i diddnt realize how dependant on veg i was for in between snacks too. im still in the fear mode about vegetables and fruit. ive never had a blockage but ive read some scary stories. and fear gas and ballooning. im now shocked by the things ive learned vs what the nirses in the hospital advised. either super extreme rigid diet or totally fine with anything. i had one tell me i could eat an almond joy candy bar that someone brought me! that was 3 days after iliostomy and still in hospital! thankfully i diddnt take her advice. :) basically im jist a newby afraid of everything. lol. tried spiralized zuchinni and carrot cooked beyond recognition for the first time yesterday. that was uneventful so im feeling more adventurous. im sure this topic had been posted before. im sorry if its a repeat. ill explore the site and see if i can find some recipes and ideas. you guys are great. 


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john68
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January 25, 2019 6:44 am  

Hi Bonbon, yep it’s going to be slow and maybe not that exciting food wise post surgery. Adding new foods slowly and noting the effect is safest way to go. Most ostomates are able to eat a normal diet. Proper preparation of food and chewing that’s the key. You mention pasta. rice and potatoes being boring try adding sauces and dressing. Baked spud With a filling just maybe avoid the skin for a while. It’s a popular topic and Eric has plenty of advice on the site.

ileostomy 31st August 1994 for Crohns


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LK
 LK
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January 25, 2019 6:22 pm  

Hello Bonnie and welcome to this site!  My surgery was in 2009. I eat anything I enjoy but in moderation. I would say to you to keep a food journal. Mark down aprox. how much. and keep going. The reason is, this will help you track what caused the problem should you have one. Usually something that was consumed within the past 72 or less hours will be what caused a blockage or made it runnier and so forth. Try not to worry about getting one, just take steps to avoid one to the best of your knowledge. I do this by eating fruits that are in season and frozen ones...such as strawberries, you can bite into a whole frozen one and they are like sherbet. Also blueberries. I enjoy fruit smoothies often. I have that magic bullet thing and I full it about half full with orange juice, then I put blueberries in it and then a whole small banana chopped, and frozen papaya, and strawberries. I top that with yogurt and whiz it up. This is often my breakfast. I add some tumeric and a bit of vanilla also, Tumeric is an anti- inflammatory, just a shake. I usually always have fruit and yogurt in some form for breakfast. Other then that I eat what I like but tend to avoid a lot of bread as it gives me a lot of gas. I figured that out thru a food journal. When I cook noodles, I cook them a little longer for myself but not to the mushy point, that is just gross. Same with veggies. I test them with a fork not a knife as  knife will go thru most things when cooked. I really dislike mushy foods and veggies so I cook them just beyond the tender crisp stage, but long enough to put a fork in the thickest part. Rice, I take 2c of rice, 4c of water, and then I add about  1/4 to 1/3 c more water. I zap it for 10  min. straight, stir, and then another ten. I take it out of the microwave, place a plate over the bowl and let it sit to absorb the rest of the remaining fluids. This way, the rice is a little softer, but not mushy to eat. I find that foods that adsorb fluids,  can cause problems if not eaten a little softer. Also smaller pieces. I love tomatoes like crazy, but I find the skin, as in oranges can cause me problems. So, I take a serrated knife and score the skin to much smaller pieces on tomatoes, Oranges, I take out of the skins they are segmented in. See Erics video on oranges causing blockages forum about a week or so ago. From there, I eat a lot of fresh fruit, like pears, honeydew, watermelon and so forth. I am a cheese and cracker and pickle fool. So when I need  snack, that is my go to. I am newly type two diabetic so now my amounts are limited. I also eat nuts and seeds, but, I chew them to a powder. Foods you can identify in your pouch are really not chewed enough. Drinking water with meals AIDS in digestion, especially fibrous foods as they absorb fluids. You see, our small gut puts fluid into our foods and take the vitamins and minerals out, and the large gut takes fluids out.  I will eat potatoe chips if  my guts are runny. They help restore the salts, and thicken up a bit. I will also eat rice and some noodles if it gets bad and continual.  From there, just basically eat what you enjoy but in moderation until you figure out what works for your guts. Everyone is different so take your time. I turn to frozen fruits when I want ice cream cheese.  If I want noodles or rice and do not have time, or if I am craving a salad, I will make some couscous and add to it olives, tomatoes, red peppers, feta cheese, and then some greek salad dressing from a bottle. I rather enjoy that for a treat and it is good for you. I also add more water to make it then what is recommended. Start by the tablespoon fulls per cup of fluid. I eat lettuce, but I break it small and then cut each bite smaller and then chew it to death.  All things in moderation. I tend to feel hungry a lot, and when I need to fill up I will eat something that requires work like a salad, rice, potatoes, and so forth but I add gravy, sauces, and cream corn to mashed potatoes. I also will put canned tomatoes on top of mashed potatoes. They go well together. Corn is hard for anyone to break down and we all need to chow down on a cob here and there. Just chew the best you can and add something like potatoes to the meal. You will figure out what your guts can handle and keeping the journal is a big part of it.  Your doing well. Keep up the good work! I hope this helps a little. 

Linda


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Dona
 Dona
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January 26, 2019 3:02 pm  

Hi Bonnie,

You will get the hang of this, but advice is both contradictory and often wrong. 

Vegetables are great in general, and I have learned to roast up a bunch of them that I know I can eat.

Mostly depends on getting them soft enough without destroying the flavor...so roasting is perfect. Maybe start with peeled smallish carrots.

Cookie sheet ( lined with tin foil, some kind of vegetable oil..I use sunflower..just a bit. HOT oven, around 425 for 30-40min until tender. I add these to prepared soups ( or homemade) to boost nutrition. ( stir the vegetables occasionally).

Learn to do other ones and mixtures that cook for about the same length of time. I stuff these into pita bread for lunch.

also, if you eat dairy, non fat Greek yogurt is a great source of protein and potassium.

It will help if you begin to keep some kind of journal about ALL things ostomy.

Good luck.

Onset of severe Ulcerative Colitus Oct.2012. Subtotal colectomy with illiostomy July 2015; Peristomal hernia repair ( Sugarbaker, mesh, laparoscopic) May 2017.


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VeganOstomy
(@veganostomy)
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January 28, 2019 3:23 pm  
Posted by: bonbon

not trying to lose any more weight. just finding that the dieticians advice for high protein foods and potato, rice, pasta etc. that im seeing weight creep up and yet i dont feel like its very nutritious. empty foods to thicken output.

You bring up a good point that I think more people who have been sick or have gone through a surgery like this should know: there will be fluctuations in weight, but assuming no medical factors, the weight should settle on one that's fairly healthy if you're not over-consuming on calories and continue to be physically fit. 

Have you calculated what your ideal weight should be (based on BMI, not personal preference)? That might help you to determine where you're at. 

I agree that many of the foods used to specifically control output (i.e. potatoes, rice, white bread), aren't particularly great for you in large quantities, but try to make those a small part of your overall diet. 

My diet has changed several times over the course of the last five years, and will likely continue to evolve based on my goals and the seasons. No harm in that, provided it's based on healthy foods. 

One thing you might want to consider is perhaps doing a food swap for some of the things you don't feel are the best - sweet potatoes instead of white potatoes; parboiled rice instead of white (I prefer parbioled over brown because brown tends to be much harder to digest and parboiled is still more nutritious over white); homemade/dehydrated kale or vegetable chips; popcorn (when you are ready) instead of processed snacks. You get the idea, right? :) 

Just your friendly neighborhood ostomate.

~ Crohn's Disease ¦ Ileostomy ~


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