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[Closed] Things easier with an ostomy  

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SqueakyandLiza
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November 10, 2019 9:12 pm  

Hi ostomates, 

I know things can be a little slow here on the weekend, so I thought this might be kind of fun. And I have a lot of things on my mind that I really don’t want to deal with right now, so this seemed like a good distraction.

I’m thinking this might be a short list but let’s try to think of things that are easier when you have an ostomy than without. Just everyday things, not the obvious lifestyle improvement so many of you experienced. 

I have two in mind to start us off. The first came from LLNorth’s post - I think colonoscopy prep is easier with an ostomy. I never had one pre-ostomy, but I’ve heard horror stories about the burning butt from going so much, and no such problem doing prep with the ostomy. 

The second one was from my own life. After my visit to the ER last weekend, my GI ordered a stool sample from me. So rather than going to the lab to get the container, taking it home to collect the sample, storing it and then taking it back to the lab, I just used the bathroom in the lab to empty my bag into the container. Voila!!

Any other things easier with an ostomy? 😀

-Liza
“May your day be bright and your bag be light.”


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LLNorth
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November 10, 2019 10:01 pm  

Hi Liza,

I am in the midst of the prep now, and that is exactly what I have been thinking this evening, it is easier to do this with an ostomy (so far!). I had a couple of colonoscopies in the years before my ostomy. Now, I am a little nervous about tomorrow’s procedure itself and also about the results (I have been a colorectal cancer patient). But then, there is always something to worry about (Are these pants too short? Is there enough gas in the car? Are the Vikings going to show Dallas who’s boss?)

LL

 

I love the smell of coffee in the morning. It smells like .... victory.


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SqueakyandLiza
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November 10, 2019 10:38 pm  

LL - I'm glad your prep is going well.  You must have an afternoon appt, if you have to do prep again in the morning.  I'm sure the procedure will be just fine.  You won't remember any of it!!  At least that is how it was for me.  I will be thinking about you tomorrow afternoon.  I hope they get the results to you quickly.  The waiting is the hardest part!!

Yes, there is always plenty to worry about.  Your Vikings are looking good--just scored to take the lead.  :)

All the best for tomorrow!!!

-Liza
“May your day be bright and your bag be light.”


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LK
 LK
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November 11, 2019 8:52 am  

I so agree! Preps are much quicker, easier &  because pain is part of my particular case,  less painful for  me! I certainly do not miss the proverbial "burning ring of fire"💥 by any means!!!🧯

I save💰 $12.00 a month on Penetin diaper rash cream for said ring! lol.

Above all, I would have to say, after experiencing incontinence, I certainly sleep better when I actually sleep!😴

Plus,  I can actually plan an outing on the foods I may eat,🍠🥬🍅  and when they are now processed.

Ignoring my last scope experience, with the right  meds on board, they have been a royal flush, 🎆 in a way I never imagined.

I have advanced to 3 ply toilet paper 🧻. I actually  use much less of it. 

Good idea Liza! Even if the majority have the same positive experiences this is great info, and dare I say encouragement, for any newbies and even us oldbies to have. 

Linda


sjlovestosing
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November 11, 2019 10:58 am  

What a great topic, Liza! I think a positive for me was that this ostomy saved my life! Each time I see it and see my scars, I am reminded of how much God was involved every step of the way - from the discovery of my colon cancer, the quick timing for my surgery, the excellent surgeon (who is a world wide known expert in the field), to this web site where I have "met" many remarkable and inspirational people. I am truly thankful for my new life!

Stella


LLNorth
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November 11, 2019 3:34 pm  

So, my easy prep was followed by an easy procedure with good results. Except that the salt drink made me feel a little sick it was all uneventful, thank goodness.

Another way an ostomy has made things easier is my wardrobe has become simpler and more comfy: stretchy pants, cute loose shirts - casual or dressy - and I am good for just about anything! 

I love the smell of coffee in the morning. It smells like .... victory.


SqueakyandLiza
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November 11, 2019 4:03 pm  

LL- that is such good news that everything went smoothly. It always feels like such a weight has been lifted when something like that is over. I’m happy that this ordeal is behind you now!

Comfy clothes are awesome, and I’m enjoying them. But I do miss some of my other clothes, which I’m trying to figure out how to wear now with the ostomy. 

-Liza
“May your day be bright and your bag be light.”


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Dona
 Dona
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November 11, 2019 6:31 pm  

I also think that just being alive is the best thing! But being able to eat again is a close second,

and being able to go out in public! Nice. Every day is a gift.

Onset of severe Ulcerative Colitus Oct.2012. Subtotal colectomy with illiostomy July 2015; Peristomal hernia repair ( Sugarbaker, mesh, laparoscopic) May 2017.


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Dona
 Dona
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November 11, 2019 6:32 pm  

and, LL its great to hear all went well today.  Wonderful.

Onset of severe Ulcerative Colitus Oct.2012. Subtotal colectomy with illiostomy July 2015; Peristomal hernia repair ( Sugarbaker, mesh, laparoscopic) May 2017.


john68
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November 11, 2019 6:47 pm  

Totally agree, being alive and able to go about every day activities! Not being chained to a bathroom or a bed. Just normal things that are so easily taken for granted 😃

ileostomy 31st August 1994 for Crohns


Tony
 Tony
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November 14, 2019 5:46 pm  

Liza,

 

Wow, thank you for starting this topic! It did kind of go the lifestyle route, but this is just the kind of positive message that ostomates need to receive. It can take such work sometimes to count our blessings, and  when one is new to an ostomy and grieving the loss of something he/she had previously taken for granted and  the forced transition to a new normal, this is exactly what we need to find online. 

 

I love how I can delay going to the bathroom with my ostomy. It used to be that I had to worry about it even when I was not flared up with my Crohn's. It has put me in greater control of my day to day life. Plus I'm not bleeding to death. What's not to love about that? 💩

Tony
Crohn's diagnosed in 1995.
Spontaneous colon perforation and emergency end ileostomy surgery in 2018.
No colon - still rollin'!
No eyesight - life still bright!
Stomaversary - December 4th


SqueakyandLiza
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November 14, 2019 6:20 pm  

Yeah, not bleeding to death is always a plus.  👍😂

-Liza
“May your day be bright and your bag be light.”


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dogtalkerer
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November 15, 2019 5:00 pm  

trying to make lemonade out of borax?   for me(rectal cancer) the stoma is a quick fix not a solution.  given the troubles people have with stomas/ostomy bags, i hardly see them as proper solutions.   human waste is not easy to clean out of a brand new neoprene wet suit.

from my understand of the IBS type problems, the stoma was  "ok, what do we do since we took out this persons large intestine?" .  so the stoma wasn't what made your life better,  but the removal of your large intestine, correct?    the stoma is just a by-product of surgery.

what I do not understand, why can't your small intestine be connected to your still functional sphincter?  why would that not be a better solution?   seems like a lot of people still have their  sphincters out there, I do not.  


SqueakyandLiza
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November 15, 2019 5:14 pm  

@dogtalkerer

From what I have read, doing a jpouch to connect the small intestines to the rectal stump has its own set of issues, and often doesn't always maintain functionality, ending up leaving less of the small intestines and a new stoma to deal with.  

In my case, the doctor was hopeful to connect me that way, but I still have significant Crohn's disease in my rectal stump, so reconnecting is not feasible at this time, and I may end up having it removed.  Though I'm hoping that is a last resort after everything is attempted to put the Crohn's into remission.

 

-Liza
“May your day be bright and your bag be light.”


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Tony
 Tony
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November 15, 2019 6:29 pm  

One of the biggest problems with reconnecting the small intestine directly to the rectal stump is chronic incontinence due to the looseness of the stool, since there's no more colon to give it its "normal" formed consistency.

 

The heart muscle is not technically capable of any of the things that poets and theologians attribute to it. It's a symbol. The stoma is also a symbol, and I dare say one that is less abstract than that of the metaphysical construct of the human heart. The semantics regarding whether the stoma itself is the solution or a byproduct may be technically accurate, but the stoma is the external and visible part of the life-saving operation that has taken place. Thus, those of us who have one view it as the life saver and the blessing, since it represents outwardly a transition from horrible chronic and sometimes life-threatening illness to a new lease on life. To split hairs regarding whether a stoma or something else is the hero of the day is beside the point. To declare that the stoma essentially doesn't matter and imply that anyone who says it does is wrong is argumentative and inflammatory. Further, to say that a colectomy is a "quick fix" for cancer is to trivialize the aggressive nature of colon cancer and the years of life that recipients of the surgery enjoy who would otherwise have died in short order and abject agony.

 

Liza, thank you again for posting this great topic. I hope and pray that someone looking for info on how good life really is after getting rid of a faulty body part like a cancerous or perforated or horribly inflamed colon or portion thereof finds this thread and takes heart.

Tony
Crohn's diagnosed in 1995.
Spontaneous colon perforation and emergency end ileostomy surgery in 2018.
No colon - still rollin'!
No eyesight - life still bright!
Stomaversary - December 4th


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SqueakyandLiza
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November 15, 2019 7:59 pm  

@ileostony

As usual, very eloquently put and to the point. 👍😀

-Liza
“May your day be bright and your bag be light.”


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LLNorth
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November 15, 2019 8:45 pm  

We have all been through quite a lot, and we’re doing what we can - I am so thankful for everybody here.  How do we do this? I can at the moment only quote Tevye the milkman:  “ .... you might say that every one of us is a fiddler on the roof. Trying to scratch out a pleasant, simple tune without breaking his neck. It isn’t easy.”

I love the smell of coffee in the morning. It smells like .... victory.


SqueakyandLiza
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November 15, 2019 8:57 pm  

@llholiday

I too, am so thankful for this site and everyone here. And now, as I lay in the hyperbaric tent thing getting oxygen, I have Fiddler on the Roof songs going through my head. 😀🎻

-Liza
“May your day be bright and your bag be light.”


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Tony
 Tony
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November 15, 2019 9:12 pm  

Oh wow I love Fiddler! L’chaim!

Tony
Crohn's diagnosed in 1995.
Spontaneous colon perforation and emergency end ileostomy surgery in 2018.
No colon - still rollin'!
No eyesight - life still bright!
Stomaversary - December 4th


LLNorth
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November 18, 2019 3:06 pm  

"Be happy! Be healthy! Long life!" L'Chaim indeed, Tony!

I love the smell of coffee in the morning. It smells like .... victory.


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