Traveling with an Ostomy | PART 2 | At the Airport & on a Plane (w/video)

Ostomy travel tips part 2 header

Now that you’ve planned and packed up for your trip, you’re all ready to get to your destination.  First, you’ll have to get through the airport and onto a plane.

In this article, I’ll be covering tips on how to make this stage in your travel plans go by smoothly.

Read moreTraveling with an Ostomy | PART 2 | At the Airport & on a Plane (w/video)

Keeping Hydrated with an Ostomy (w/ video)

keeping hydrated with an ostomy

Dehydration sucks, and anyone without a colon has likely been told by their nurse or doctor that maintaining adequate hydration is crucial. While it can be a challenge to keep up with fluid intake, there are many ways to do it. In this article, I’d like to share some practical tips that I’ve used myself, along with tips that have worked for others.

This information is focused on ileostomates, but many of these strategies can be used to help prevent dehydration in other circumstances, including diarrhea caused by IBD or for other types of ostomies.

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Ileoscopy prep – getting scoped through a stoma

scope

On July 9th, I’ll be getting scoped as a follow up to my ostomy surgery and to also make sure that my Crohn’s hasn’t spread to my small intestine.  When we lose our colon, we don’t expect that we’ll ever need to be scoped again, but the reality is that those of us with IBD (especially Crohn’s) need to get monitored to make sure that our illness is kept in check.  Before getting my stoma, I was told that my chances of Crohn’s spreading to other parts of my bowel were very low – still, it’s always a possibility.  While researching for my post on the Environmental Risk Factors for IBD, I came to realize that even though I can make lifestyle decisions which can reduce my chance of flaring or a reoccurrence, nothing is guaranteed.   I was feeling pretty great after my last two surgeries, but after receiving a tetanus booster in February, my joints started hurting and haven’t felt right ever since.  This reminded me that my body is still primed for IBD, losing a colon didn’t cure it and there will always be a chance that Crohn’s will one day rear its ugly head again.

Read moreIleoscopy prep – getting scoped through a stoma